Category: Travel

Holiday Rental Apartments – Cordoba Spain – An Intriguing Destination

Cordoba is a very interesting part of southern Spain to book a self-catering holiday rental apartment or holiday villas in Spain for some summer sun. Cordoba is the principal city of its province and the most important city in Andalucia after Seville. Cordoba was founded by the Romans and it became a significant port city used for shipping Spanish olive oil and wine back to Rome.

As for bull-fighting the season starts in May, during the Feria de Cordoba (Cordoba Fair)

Cordoba also has a strong Moorish influence as it was once the capital of the Moorish kingdom of El-Andalus and this was when work began on the Great Mosque or Mezquita which today is such a landmark of this intriguing city.ClimateHolidaymakers who are thinking of visiting Cordoba and booking a holiday rental apartment or a villa holiday letting in Spain here will be interested to know what sort of weather to expect. The months of June, July, August, and September are the hottest summer months. At this time of the year temperatures may reach 104 degrees Fahrenheit during the daytime and 64 degrees Fahrenheit at night. Rain is rare in the summer months especially in the middle of the season. The following are a few tips to cope with the very hot summer weather:Wear light, loose-fitting cotton or linen clothing. If you are going out sightseeing or walking try to do this in the morning between about 9am and 1pm. Carry a bottle of water with you and drink regularly so you don’t get dehydrated.

This is a lovely time to visit the city and many people enjoy a fino sherry in one of the local bodegas as they stroll around the city

The locals eat lunch late, about 2:30 – 3pm and then have a lengthy ‘siesta’. You will find a good nap, with the blinds drawn, will set you up for the evening!FoodWhen you are visiting Cordoba and staying in your self-catering holiday rental apartment or villa holiday letting in Spain what sort of local dishes should you try? Gazpacho and Salmorejo are delicious and refreshing cold soups made mainly of pureed vegetables and olive oil and are very popular as the first dish during the hot season. Try some of the cold meats and sausages such as Jamon, a type of cured ham, chorizo or morcilla (black pudding). Typical main dishes from Cordoba are Bull’s tail (Estofado de Rabo de Buey) and lamb stew (Cordero en Caldereta). Typical desserts often have an Arabian influence such as Alfajores, made of almonds and honey and Pestinos, a sweet fried in oil and covered with honey.Things to SeeThere are many interesting places to visit for those who are staying in privately rented holiday villas in Spain or a holiday rental apartment in charming Cordoba.

This royal fortress is worth a visit because of its historical value, splendid architecture and spectacular, panoramic views

The following are just some which are worth a look:The Almodovar Castle stands 252m and was built by the Arabs in the year 720. It belonged to the Caliphate of Cordoba and has since housed several monarchs. This royal fortress is worth a visit because of its historical value, splendid architecture and spectacular, panoramic views.La Mezquita is a huge, tenth century building in Cordoba which was formerly a Mosque consisting of several arches and over a hundred columns. The architectural design of this stunning building is a mixture of Roman, Gothic, Byzantine, Syrian and Persian influences.The Cordoba Synagogue is rare because it is the only one in the Andalusia region and one of only three in the whole of Spain. The beautiful interiors and the walls are covered with rich white Mudejar style decorations and Hebrew inscriptions.Flamenco Bull-fightingThose holidaymakers who are staying in a holiday rental apartment or a villa holiday letting in Spain in Cordoba can experience two spectacles which Spain is famous for, these are Flamenco and Bull-fighting. All around the city of Cordoba, particularly near the Mezquita, are flamenco clubs where you can listen and watch exciting flamenco performances. The Tablao Cardenal is a favourite place to see some of the purest styles of Andalucian flamenco – the alegrias, the solea and the bulerias. You can even take courses in flamenco dancing and flamenco guitar if it takes your fancy. As for bull-fighting the season starts in May, during the Feria de Cordoba (Cordoba Fair). Both locals and tourists gather in the bullring to watch the experience. There is also a Bullfight Museum in the historic Jewish quarter which pays tribute to the bullfighters of Cordoba and the rest of Andalucia.FestivalsCordoba also loves its festivals and fiestas and many are celebrated throughout the year. No matter when you book your holiday villas Spain or your holiday rental apartment you will most likely experience a colourful festival! During Semana Santa (Holy Week) at the end of March the city streets are crowded and are full of extravagant processions. Cordoba is renowned for its flower-filled patios that are opened to the public for the Patio Festival in May. This is a lovely time to visit the city and many people enjoy a fino sherry in one of the local bodegas as they stroll around the city. The Cordoba Guitar Festival takes place from 6-25th July each year and it includes a training programme with courses on classical, Flamenco, contemporary and modern guitar building, there are also Flamenco dancing and singing courses.

If you want an interesting summer holiday choose a holiday letting in Spain in Cordoba. There are a selection of beautiful holiday villas in Spain on offer, if you search on-line. You can book a villa or a holiday rental apartment in Cordoba directly with the private owners. Eddie Lucas, the author, works for the Holiday-Villa-Select website which offers cost effective holiday rentals in Spain booked direct with owners who advertise their holiday villa or apartment on this website no commission charged.

Priego de Cordoba – A Jewel of Andalucia

Priego de Cordoba sits in the heart of Andalusia, surrounded by a landscape of mountains, olive trees and picturesque rock escarpments. The town is built on the edge of a plateau, which ensures that the approach by car is both dramatic and memorable.Priego has encapsulated within it the history of the region. Moorish castle, alongside Catholic Churches, illustrating the clash of religion and culture that characterized hundreds of years of Spanish history.

Today the adjacent square is a location where locals patronize the cafes and restaurants, enjoying the ambience of a balmy Spanish evening

A visit to Priego is a must if you visit Andalucia. Walk through the original Muslim area, known as the ‘Villa’. Here white streets are narrow and the air is full of the scent of flowers. It is not difficult to imagine a former era when the district would have pulsated with Moorish life. Adjacent is the Adarve, a natural viewpoint open to the Andaluz countryside with its uneven cliff, which guaranteed Priego’s security throughout its history.Leaving the Adarve you approach the Moorish castle. Today the adjacent square is a location where locals patronize the cafes and restaurants, enjoying the ambience of a balmy Spanish evening.Few streets in Spain can compare with Calle Rio lined with grand houses, which all have one thing in common – magnificent facades.

Here white streets are narrow and the air is full of the scent of flowers

Here the merchants of Priego lived when the town was at its most prosperous during the 18th century. But along this street is another gem – The Fuente del Rey (or Kings Fountain). It is organized in three tanks surrounded by 139 spouts and was reputed at one time to be the largest fountain in Spain – a claim which I’m sure is not unique.A few days in Priego will be amply rewarded. Beautiful streets, wonderful plazas, magnificent Baroque churches and most important of all – the one thing guide books don’t mention – the friendly Priegans who will endeavour to make your visit one you will never forget.

Today the adjacent square is a location where locals patronize the cafes and restaurants, enjoying the ambience of a balmy Spanish evening

Casa de Suenos Guesthouse is only a short car journey away – more details at [http://www.suenos-es.com]

The Medina Califal, Cordoba – Waterborn Heaven

Sweat bathing – be it in the form of the Finnish sauna, the Russian bania, the Turkish hammam, or an American Indian sweatlodge – is as common to the world as the baking of bread and the squeezing of the grape. These are based on dry rooms, but the Medina Califal in Cordoba in Andalucia, are designed in a typical mudejar style, where the baths are a series of pools of between 19 and 40.As you enter the baths from the changing rooms you come into a small antechamber that houses the cold room.

These are based on dry rooms, but the Medina Califal in Cordoba in Andalucia, are designed in a typical mudejar style, where the baths are a series of pools of between 19 and 40

A word of warning; do not take a first dip into the long, thin bath facing you. This is not as cool as a mountain stream – it is as jaw clenching, buttock tensing icy as a recently melted iceberg. This is stage two, after the small bath to your left, which drops your temperature to darn cold, but at least prepares you for the frozen submersion to follow.After the shock of the cold room, sinking into the delicious warmth of the first pool is like slipping into a silken robe. Sepulchral lighting comes from the tiny circles and stars that perforate the domed ceiling, casting glittering reflections on the water below. Red encased candles of the type usually seen adorning altars, flicker from wall niches or cast upward glows from the base of marble pillars. The classical dome shape of the Arab arch, constructed of alternate blocks of white and maroon painted stone, rises from the pillars to form a colonnade around the bath. Above them the walls are washed with shades of deep pink in such a way as to make it look as if the bath has been there for centuries, and transmutes the subdued lighting into a roseate glow.The muted sound of Arab music is disturbed only by the water cascading from the fonts that keep the three pools at the required temperature. (One of the delights of the gushing water is to plunge your head under a spout and feel the warmth bubbling over your body.

Aromatic oils are used, and the comforting hands of the masseur uncoil and un-kink knotted muscles and when you slither off the bench fifteen minutes later and submerse yourself into the delicious warmth of the pool half-a-metre away, the world may not be a better place, but quite frankly – you don’t care

) If the conversation of the clients rises to more than a subdued hubbub, the masseur, calmly working on the tables alongside the bath, will quietly bring a return to tranquility.From the light of the first pool a few steps through an arched entrance takes you to two smaller pools. As the size decreases the temperature rises, and the ambient light fades. Whispered conversations drift across the water as you sit on the sunken ledges, savouring the warmth lapping your body from the tiny wavelets created as newcomers walk down the steps.

(One of the delights of the gushing water is to plunge your head under a spout and feel the warmth bubbling over your body

Entering the final pool, smaller and hotter than the rest, is like settling into the comfort of your bath at home – at least it would be if it was made of marble and a metre deep. Bathed in soft illumination filtering through the Moorish arch, pinpointed by the pink radiance from the fluttering candles, disturbed by no other sound than the waterfall effect of the circulating water, this is as near to waterborne heaven as it is likely to get.When you tire of the heated pools you can just sit on the marble floor, lean against the marble walls, and sweat yourself to sleep.At some time during your ninety minutes you will be invited to stretch out on a padded bench for a massage. You choose either head, shoulders and back, or legs and feet. Aromatic oils are used, and the comforting hands of the masseur uncoil and un-kink knotted muscles and when you slither off the bench fifteen minutes later and submerse yourself into the delicious warmth of the pool half-a-metre away, the world may not be a better place, but quite frankly – you don’t care.It isn’t wise to leave the baths directly from the hot pool and you are advised to end the session by taking alternate dips between the cold bath and the first warm pool, ending with a final dip in the icy trough. It still turns your toes inwards, but the effect isn’t quite as brain numbing as before.

I am a freelance journalist living in Valencia City, Spain, although my work takes me throughout the country. My work is pretty wide ranging, both in subject and geography, but my heart lies in Spain, which is where most of writing concentrates on. I’ve written two successful guide books to the Valencian region, on Spain’s eastern coast, Inland Trips from the Costa Blanca and Small Hotels and Inns of Eastern Spain, as well as many articles for national and international press. While most of my work features the idiosyncratic side of Spain, I’ve also written extensively on wine, gastronomy and hotels.To discover more about Spain, visit [http://www.derekworkman-journalist.com] and http://derekworkman.wordpress.com.

Cordoba Solista Flamenco Acoustic Guitar

The Cordoba Solista is regarded as an excellent flamenco guitar known for its attack which is sharp and punchy and for possessing that all important quick decay so vital for flamenco instruments. When playing the guitar you feel its immediate response to your actions, constantly rewarding you with an authentic and fiery flamenco sound.The tone of the guitar is open and bright and when played well will produce a singing quality with plenty of volume to cut through the other instruments and fill the room. The Cordoba Solista plays well whether strummed aggressively or plucked sweetly, to date most users have found the instrument to be versatile and rewarding.

The Cordoba Solista plays well whether strummed aggressively or plucked sweetly, to date most users have found the instrument to be versatile and rewarding

Woods on this guitar consist of a cypress back and sides plus a top soundboard made of European spruce. This classic combination of woods is what gives flamenco guitars their punch and attack which is very different from the sustain of concert classical guitars. Different styles of music require different qualities to be accentuated in their corresponding instruments.Aesthetically the Cordoba Flamenco Acoustic Guitar is gorgeous to look at featuring a wonderful flamenco body shape which is so recognizable. The inlays are very delicate and the headstock has been carved out beautifully and lacquered with various veneers to a polished sheen. It makes the guitar look exquisite.To complete the package this guitar is supplied with a humicase to maintain its woods in a perfectly controlled environment within the case. This way you can be assured that your instrument will last a lifetime when well cared for and only sound better and better as the woods gradually age.Cordoba Flamenco Guitars are made in Spain.

This classic combination of woods is what gives flamenco guitars their punch and attack which is very different from the sustain of concert classical guitars

Payo Perry is an expert online author for guitar lessons. Be sure to visit his website for free sample acoustic guitar lessons. The website also contains lots of lessons for easy guitar songs.

Historic Sightseeing in Cordoba City

When it comes to getting to know Cordoba city there is plenty of interesting historic alternatives to explore.San Martin is the main square of the city, where the typical idiosyncrasy of the people from Cordoba can be found.Cordobeses, the way people from Cordoba are called locally, have been always regarded as friendly and open-minded citizens.

It is not necessary to walk long distances to sightsee other historical places as most of these landmarks are not far away from the main square above mentioned

The Cabildo -the old Town Hall- is in front of the main square where you can find beautiful gardens, rooms and halls where different art exhibitions from local artists usually take place. Right on the left of The Cabildo, across a narrow road called Pasaje Santa Catalina and keeping alive the colonial environment of the XVIth Century you will find the Cathedral, one of the most important landmarks of the city. Inside the church you will see impressive and majestic drawings, paintings and statues. Its architecture includes a number of aesthetic styles which goes from neoclassic and certain indoamerican influences, discovered at the main door and towers to a romantic and baroque mixed style recognized in the dome.The figures of the ancient buildings are projected over the esplanade of the square.
It is not necessary to walk long distances to sightsee other historical places as most of these landmarks are not far away from the main square above mentioned.Another attractive visit is the Museum of Religious Art Juan de Tejeda located in El Convento de las Carmelitas descalzas de Santa Teresa de Jesús. The museum displays the most important collection of religious art that once belonged to the Cathedral’s treasure.One block from San Martin square, in Rosario de Santa Fe Street, you can visit the Marqués de Sobremonte Historic State Museum.

It is not necessary to walk long distances to sightsee other historical places as most of these landmarks are not far away from the main square above mentioned

This is a beautiful colonial house where Don Rafael Nuñez Castillo, Marqués de Sobremonte, governor of Cordoba lived between 1780 and 1796. The building gathers important pieces of the colonial period, including religious art pieces, weapons, china, musical instruments, furniture, paintings and silverware. It also includes an important library. This a valuable building characterized by its architectural quality and as for being an important icon of the colonial period which invites the visitor to get familiar with the way of life held centuries ago.
Another remarkable place is the Founder’s square, recently remodeled where there is a statue of Don Jerónimo Luis de Cabrera, Córdoba’s founder.

Visit COINED Spanish Schools in Argentina and get to know a bit more about Argentina.

Also and interesting web site is COINED Study Abroad Blog

Also and interesting web site is COINED Study Abroad Blog. Cordoba, in Argentina, is a very good choice to learn Spanish in Latin America.

Where to Visit in Cordoba Spain

Like the Seville area, the province of Cordoba is landlocked, though that should not be a reason for the more adventurous visitor to not visit either for both are fascinating. The area of Cordoba is split by the powerful Rio Guadalquivir on which lies the ancient town of Cordoba, founded by the Romans, though it flourished under the Moorish occupation and this is evident in the architecture found all over the city.Built on a sharp bend of the brook which is crossed by the Roman bridge, the El Puente Romano, the town was a port.

Summers here are dry and hot, so that the best time of the year to go to is during the cooler spring and autumn months, where you’ll find towns that still hold on to their Spanish values, something that has just about all but disappeared from the Costas to the south

When the Moors were replaced by the Christians, the city’s beauty was left untouched and the Christian cathedral was built in the mosque, the Mezquita. The Mezquita dates back to the twelve century and symbolizes the power of the Moorish Islamic influence on this region of Andalucia. Built in 785AD by Abd al Rahman, the mosque has been added to over the generations by both Christian and Islamic faiths as they each controlled this area.At the centre of Cordoba is the old Jewish quarter where little has changed in centuries, narrow streets and garden squares, tapas bars and eateries, an ideal area to explore and relax in the Spanish way. The bull fighting museum and the cool and refreshing fountains and gardens of the Alcazar de los Reyes Cristianos are definitely worth a visit both being open from Tues. to Sunday.Move outside of the town into the area of Cordoba, and you will find it quite unoccupied, most of the population live in the city itself while the remainder are spread out in this giant unexploited area. Summers here are dry and hot, so that the best time of the year to go to is during the cooler spring and autumn months, where you’ll find towns that still hold on to their Spanish values, something that has just about all but disappeared from the Costas to the south.

Do you love to see the world? Want to see some of the best places in the world? Visit famouswonders.

to Sunday

com to get an idea of where to go for your next vacation. Make sure to also check out Toledo.

Places of Interest in Spain – The Cordoba Mosque

The Mosque of Cordoba has had an interesting history, beginning as a Moorish Mosque in the 10th century and consecrated as a Christian Cathedral in the 13th century after the conquest of Cordoba. Throughout the years it has undergone many alterations. The Royal Chapel was built after the Reconquest as a pantheon for Spanish Kings and has also been much improved by succeeding generations. A nave was added later while the minaret of the old Mosque was converted into a bell tower.

Throughout the years it has undergone many alterations

Some sections of the mosque were converted from the original Arabic architecture to Mudejar or converted to Moorish style and later to Gothic style.Inside the MosqueThe inside of the Mosque is stunning, with a profusion of arches and pillars that gives one the impression of being inside a tent in the desert. The arches were made with alternating segments of brick and stone, the red brick layers alternating with the white stone layers and making us aware that though we are in a Christian church, this was once a Moorish house of worship. The profusion of columns further adds to the sensation of being inside a desert dwelling.The MihrabThe Mihrab had its origins in the prayer niches of the Coptic Christians. In mosques it is usually placed in the wall facing Mecca and is often decorated. At the mosque in Cordoba, it has been lavishly decorated since it was built in the age of the greatest splendor of Moorish Spain.

The profusion of columns further adds to the sensation of being inside a desert dwelling

Golden Byzantine mosaics make us aware that Cordoba was one of the most prosperous as well as populous cities of Europe. Its poets, intellectuals and artisans excelled in their pursuits and their influence is seen in the construction of the mosque.The CathedralIn the sixteenth century, a cathedral was built inside the mosque and over the years, it has been improved and decorated by Spain’s best craftsmen. The Gothic style of the cathedral is particularly interesting because of the many items that are a part of the decor. Two mahogany pulpits with a life-sized bull and lion in marble are some of the attractions that welcome the tourists.The Bell TowerThe Bell Tower, originally the minaret of the mosque, is a good place to get some stupendous views of the city of Cordoba. You will need to climb a number of steps to get there but the effort is well worth it.

Golden Byzantine mosaics make us aware that Cordoba was one of the most prosperous as well as populous cities of Europe

The mosque itself is set on a hill and the height of the bell tower makes it an ideal place to see the surrounding countryside as well.

Read about spanish villas also read about rent villas in ibiza.

The Exquisite Patio Contests of Cordoba, Spain

I saw this program in a German television channel and it made me sit up, admiring and extolling its uniqueness. Cordoba city has four spring festivals during the month of May and this one is worth sharing with you. Yes, I now there are many of you who are aware of it and some may have even been there to witness the beautiful creations; however, I know there are many of us who were not aware of such intrinsic cultural sides of far-flung countries.Spain is probably famous for other things than just flowers, but the Patio Contests held in Cordoba since 1918 speaks volumes about the creative nature of the locals.

Stone columns adorned with fresh green leaves and the branches heavy with blossoms is so “pregnantly” spring, full of promises anew

The festival commences from the 2nd of May and continues till mid-May and is open to all and sundry. It is said that the beauty comes alive when the sun sets and the courtyards are lit up enticingly from secret corners.From the Roman times most of the traditional houses in Cordoba had central courtyards to beat the heat and keep the house cool in summer. Home owners planted flowering plants and other indoor plants in these courtyards so watering them helped cool the house interiors as well. People started getting more creative and did up their courtyards in unique and individual designs; soon this creativity, which lasted for ten days, became a city festival.Presently the Cordoba City Hall sponsors the Patio Contests in May and visitors get to choose the best of the numerous patios in the city. These patios or courtyards have planted flowers of different hues hanging from many different angles or arranged artistically on the ground. You might get a peek of a traditional window peeping out between white and pink jasmines or a sparkling mirror placed in an advantageous position to double the marvelous effects.

Cordoba city has four spring festivals during the month of May and this one is worth sharing with you

The patio decorations are not just flowers and plants; they also include cleverly placed artifacts of ceramics, stone mosaics and water features which add romance to the presentations. Stone columns adorned with fresh green leaves and the branches heavy with blossoms is so “pregnantly” spring, full of promises anew. And how can one forget the scents and aromas of the collection of plants in each patio, the very thought can bring the wafting aroma to you, wherever you are.I have seen flower shows and beautifully manicured gardens with layers of exotic flowers in unique designs. Bonsai gardens and ethereal Japanese gardens are also so unique to behold and wonder about the gardener’s creative skills.

Nevertheless, these personal home patios in Cordoba seem special because of the homeowners’ love for flowers, spring, their aesthetic skills and the willingness to freely share their artwork with everyone

Nevertheless, these personal home patios in Cordoba seem special because of the homeowners’ love for flowers, spring, their aesthetic skills and the willingness to freely share their artwork with everyone.

Best of Cordoba, Spain – The Top Attractions

To see where Christianity and Islam collided and fused, go to Cordoba, Spain, an ancient city in Andalucia, Spain’s southernmost province, situated some 75 miles (121 km) northeast of Seville. For here, in Cordoba, Romans, Goths, Jews, Moors and Christians triumphed and succumbed in succession, molding the city in their own image, to offer up a surprising amalgam of cultures and religions, and a couple of architectural gems besides.And for first-time visitors to this colorful, sun-drenched Spanish city, here are its top attractions.1.

The museum is open daily, and there is an admission fee of 2

La MezquitaIf Cordoba is famous for one thing, it is its mosque-cum-cathedral, La Mezquita. This is among the largest mosques in the world, and singularly the most astonishing with its mad mix of Islamic, Mudejar, Renaissance and Baroque influences. Begun in 784 AD and built on the site of a Visigoth church, which in turn was built on the site of a Roman temple, the original mosque was embellished and added to over the centuries; until in the 13th century, when Christians conquered the city and consecrated the mosque to be a Christian cathedral, a chapel was added, followed in 1523 by a Christian cathedral built inside the original mosque. While the exterior of the mosque/cathedral may appear nondescript, the interior is deeply mesmerizing, with more than 800 columns with Roman capitals and horseshoe arches, patterned in yellow and red, one atop another, in a petrified forest that literally saturates a couple of dozen naves. La Mezquita is open to the public from April until June, daily except Sunday; admission fee is 6.50 euros.2.

For here, in Cordoba, Romans, Goths, Jews, Moors and Christians triumphed and succumbed in succession, molding the city in their own image, to offer up a surprising amalgam of cultures and religions, and a couple of architectural gems besides

La Alcazar de los Reyes ChristianosIn another example of the clash of Christianity and Islam, La Alcazar de los Reyes Christianos, a Gothic fortress cum royal residence, stands atop a Muslim castle, no less. The Alcazar was begun in 1327 under Alfonso XI, and was later on the residence of Catholic monarchs Ferdinand and Isabel who, it is claimed, saw Christopher Columbus off on his trip to the New World from there. From the battlements of the fortress, which overlook the Guadalquivir, there are good views of Puente Romano, the Roman Bridge built by Emperor Augustus. The fortress, located at Campo Santo de los Martires, is open daily. Admission fee: 2 euros.3.

La MezquitaIf Cordoba is famous for one thing, it is its mosque-cum-cathedral, La Mezquita

Cordoba’s SynagogueCordoba’s Synagogue, representing a Mudejar work that dates from 1315, is the last of its kind in existence in southern Spain. Of particular interest here are the floral motifs and epigraphs on the interior walls that reference psalms and the Song of Songs. The synagogue is open daily.4. La Casa AndalusiLa Casa Andalusi, located at Judios 12, is a showcase of the elegant living quarters of Al-Andalus. Here you can visit an ivory-colored patio with a pebbled mosaic floor and also a basement with traces of the Visigothic era. There is a room dedicated entirely to the Moorish culture at the casa as well, displaying Arabic coins, clothing and artworks, and an early-day printing press that was used to print the Koran during that period. The museum is open daily, and there is an admission fee of 2.50 euros per person.5. Museo ArqueologicoIn eight fully-stocked rooms on two levels, the Museo Arqueologico exhibits prehistoric and Roman-era artifacts such as coins, sculptures and mosaics, as well as 4th- and 8th-century Visigothic and Muslim relics. The museum is located at Plaza Jeronimo Paez 7, and open daily, except Monday. Museum admission is 1.50 euro each.

Baljeet Sangwan is a globetrotter, travel editor and travel writer who has published 12 travel guidebooks. He is a co-publisher at iChiefTravel and a contributor to the Cordoba, Spain and Sevilla (Seville), Spain travel guides.

Places of Interest in Spain – Cordoba

A city of Andalusia, Cordoba is filled with marvelous works of architecture. Many of the heritage buildings are found in Cordoba. Apart from historical buildings, the city has many parks and museums which attract large number of tourists all through the year. Now let us go around this city.

The Mosque is an outstanding example of Roman and Visigoth architecture

Brief history:The earliest human presence in this area according to experts can be traced to 32000 BC. The Romans, Moors and Christians left their indelible impression on the life of people here. Some of the religious practices followed by these ancient civilizations are practiced even to this day.How to reach?It is about one hour drive from Malaga Airport. The place is very well connected by road from Zaragosa, Madrid, Barcelona and Malaga. Fast train services are also available from these cities.Boarding and lodging:There are plenty of villas and apartments where the tourist can stay comfortably.

The mosque of Cordoba which was constructed during the period of Ummayad civilization and later converted into a Cathedral is one of the main attractions of this city

Accommodation is available to suit all categories of tourists. There are plenty of hotels, restaurants and bars which provide most delicious food.Places of interest:Tour operators are of the opinion that at least about three to four days are required to visit all the major tourist spots in Cordoba. The mosque of Cordoba which was constructed during the period of Ummayad civilization and later converted into a Cathedral is one of the main attractions of this city. The Mosque is an outstanding example of Roman and Visigoth architecture. The city has many churches of fame like the Church of San Agustin, Church of San Miguel, Church of San Pedro, San Andres church to name a few. Apart from this, there are many monasteries.

Tourists have a wide range of museums to visit in Cordoba

Tourists are advised to visit Walcha cave which is believed to have been built in 1489. Some of the outstanding works carried out during Roman Empire like Roman Bridge, Roman Mausoleum and Roman temple are other places of interest in Cordoba. Tourists have a wide range of museums to visit in Cordoba. Some of the popular museums are Dioceses Museum, Three culture museum, Bull fighting museum, Julio Romeo de museum and Archeological and Ethnological museumThere are plenty of parks like Park of Miraflores, Park Cruz Conde, Garden of Agriculture, Garden of the victory and Garden of the Conde de Vallellano.Festivals:May festival is one of the most popular festivals of Cordoba. Patios festival is celebrated during this period. Private people can compete by decorating the patios. Many people from far and wide take part in this festival.

If you are planning for family vacations, staying at villas may be a great option villa in spain, villa in ibiza are few of best options.